collections

SPRING 2014

Spring-2014

DETAILS

YEOHLEE’s Spring 2014 Collection has a site specific inspiration – Jones Wood Garden where the show is being held. Woodsy, pretty colors in pink hues and shades of green and grey are the palette.

FALL 2013

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DETAILS

YEOHLEE’s Fall 2013 is a celebration of the freedom of expression that we enjoy today that we cannot take for granted. The collection is full of diversity of cut and color and clothes that enjoy the freedom of movement and ease.

SPRING 2013

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DETAILS

YEOHLEE’s Spring 2013 Collection is constructed in the same spirit of whimsy out of material that are locally and internationally sourced, as well as vintage stock and fabric ends. The intention is to practice sustainability by using up available material and adhering to Yeohlee’s core philosophy of zero waste.

FALL 2012

fall-2012

DETAILS

“The magic of mathematics” is Yeohlee Teng’s inspiration for her Fall 2012 collection. With great regard for geometry and the human form Yeohlee sets about cloaking and draping the body in circles, triangles and squares.

Yeohlee’s choice of fabrics leads off with an acid green felted wool coat (A) with selvedge edged construction as a measure of conservation and a nod to zero waste, themes that have permeated her work from the beginning. In contrast, a grey marbleized cotton knit jacket (B) hangs next to the coat, followed by a laser cut black gabardine dress (C), washable by hand. Next to it is a purple silk faille shirt that can double as a jacket (D). The selection of material expands on the simulated runway in type, texture, weight, content and color with patterns and prints as highlights.

Sharp edged geometry is softened by the weight of jerseys and sculptural when constructed with materials such as felt, faille and gazar. Look 6 and installations J and L are constructed with same size circles and inspired by the Venn Diagram, the image on Yeohlee’s invitation.

SPRING 2012

spring-2012

DETAILS

Yeohlee’s inspiration has evolved from the built environment to the Architecture of Energy and the Shape of Sound. Energy and sound are invisible to the eye yet they have a profound influence on our daily lives. Cutter ants, the spaces they occupy in a world envisioned by Lebbeus Woods are Yeohlee’s sources of inspiration for Spring 2011.

Within YEOHLEE’s Spring 2011 collection, interstitial spaces are created by the intersection of opposing crescent shapes that form the lantern shaped skirts in Look 1 and 5. Rectangles and circles create cylinders that morph into the dress in Look 18 and the knit skirt in Look 19.

The linear and angular patterns of the fabric in the collection are woven or knit from cotton, linen and silk yarns with metal added in some instances to give the surface an irregular texture as in the grey metallic ruched skirt, Look 14. The hand knit sweaters (Looks 16 and 17) and crochet top, Look 13, are the result of Yeohlee’s collaboration with local artisans.

The palette is textural with introductions of blue and marigold into fields of white and shades of grey.

The collection is as much about ideas as it is about wearable clothes. The pairing of the Bensimon shoes with the collection suggests how comfortable ideas can be.

FALL 2011

fall-2011

DETAILS

For Fall 2011 Yeohlee finds inspiration in the forms of the experimental musical instruments created by the Baschet Brothers; in Harry Bertoia’s brass and steel sound scupltures and in the wind-powered Singing Ringing Tree by architects Mike Tonkin and Anna Liu.

The collection introduces a system of dressing that has a multi-cultural aesthetic and a nomadic feel. The cape in Look 2 is constructed out of a rectangle and a circle, in an Italian wool/cotton mélange fabric, and made in midtown. The resulting cylinder cape is worn over an alpaca poncho, hand knitted in Bolivia, over a bubble knit polo shirt in fabric from Japan.

The last three dresses are made from the lightest weight fabric woven with silver threads on black sheer viscose. Here the fabric shines through with a minimal number of cuts and seams to each dress.

Yeohlee’s Fall 2011 is a celebration of fabric, yarns, textures and colors, of contrasts in weight and surface, and of the sleek and the street.

SPRING 2011

spring-2011

DETAILS

Yeohlee’s inspiration has evolved from the built environment to the Architecture of Energy and the Shape of Sound. Energy and sound are invisible to the eye yet they have a profound influence on our daily lives. Cutter ants, the spaces they occupy in a world envisioned by Lebbeus Woods are Yeohlee’s sources of inspiration for Spring 2011.

Within YEOHLEE’s Spring 2011 collection, interstitial spaces are created by the intersection of opposing crescent shapes that form the lantern shaped skirts in Look 1 and 5. Rectangles and circles create cylinders that morph into the dress in Look 18 and the knit skirt in Look 19.

The linear and angular patterns of the fabric in the collection are woven or knit from cotton, linen and silk yarns with metal added in some instances to give the surface an irregular texture as in the grey metallic ruched skirt, Look 14. The hand knit sweaters (Looks 16 and 17) and crochet top, Look 13, are the result of Yeohlee’s collaboration with local artisans.

The palette is textural with introductions of blue and marigold into fields of white and shades of grey.

The collection is as much about ideas as it is about wearable clothes. The pairing of the Bensimon shoes with the collection suggests how comfortable ideas can be.

FALL 2010

fall-2010

DETAILS

For Fall 2010, Yeohlee visualizes artist Kazimir Malevich’s Black Circle springing out into a cylinder. This collection revels in a surrealist element of surprise and unexpected, playful juxtapositions. Strong geometric shapes are combined with soft nubby yarns, whimsical dots and plaids, and sleek hi-tech fabrications— topped off with handknit high hats. Yeohlee likes to imagine these clothes being worn in a postapocalyptic space station, by cadets making music with a saw.

SPRING 2010

Spring-10

DETAILS

Like clothing, sound surrounds us. Frequently inspired by the built environment in her design process, Yeohlee takes it into the invisible sonic dimension for Spring 2010. The inspiration began with tropical birds and their colorful plumage, evolved into the construction of their nests, which then led to bird calls and birdsongs. Sound is envisioned as waves that rustle over the bodice of Look 13 – in a stripe embroidery fabric suggestive of a musical score – and cascade down the front & back in Look 8. Interlocking sound wave patterns weave a jersey nest around the shoulders in Look 19. The repetition of these geometric elements creates a resounding rhythm of shapes, fabricated in materials with acoustic textures.

FALL 2009

fall-2009

DETAILS

Drawing on the principle of economy in design, fabric and execution, YEOHLEE’S Fall 2009 collection was created with zero waste. Every inch of the fabric is used; not one scrap of material is wasted. Crafted from the most utilitarian of fabrics, the worker group propels the suit into fresh territory, equipping the worker with a modular and functional versatility, a necessity in today’s environment.

SPRING 2009

collage

DETAILS

YEOHLEE’s Spring 2009 silhouettes are exploded geometric forms such as the cube, the crescent and the parabola. Expanding the concept of public space to include our oceans, the jellyfish becomes an important shape, floating through Tschumi’s rigid grid, creating a buoyant dialogue between the supple and the solid. Pearly translucent polyurethane coated knit rainwear, mercurial linen lamé, misty white knits in cotton and a coral reef print silk organza, net a collection that balances density with lightness.

FALL 2008

collage

DETAILS

For Fall 2008, YEOHLEE began by appropriating the design and spiritual values of the Shakers, imagining them in a SANAA environment. Valuing utility, function, and the economical use of materials, YEOHLEE crafts a collection of objects that is reductive, created for comfort, work and travel. YEOHLEE’s design philosophy is forward thinking, global in approach and not linked to any single cultural identity.

SPRING 2008

collage

DETAILS

Yeohlee’s Spring 2008 collection was inspired by the mission architecture of the American Southwest, primarily the churches of New Mexico. The starkness of their blocky white-washed adobe shapes, against the mutable changing light of the brilliant desert sky, informed her choice of colors, fabrics, and many variations of the simplest of geometric forms-the square box.

FALL 2007

mpanel

DETAILS

This season Yeohlee references Antoni Gaudí, a structural genius who created undulating forms that look so organic and free and yet were constructed with the utmost discipline. By choosing an array of textural materials such as felted woolens, membrane-like cotton, featherweight silk organdy woven with undulating velvet stripes and metallic taffetas embroidered with a granular rice pattern, Yeohlee’s volumetric forms possess three dimensionality with little rigidity. The garments are further enhanced with a subtle color palette of mostly black, white and grey.

SPRING 2007

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DETAILS

Yeohlee’s focus is on reducing the number of fabrics used and exploring to the maximum the innate potential within each of the materials. Yeohlee chose natural fibres as her core medium with an abundance of cotton, linen and silk. The weight and weave of these yarns are what gives the materials their structure, lustre and sheen. The color palette is light and bright, consisting mostly of unexpected textures in white and black.

FALL 2006

panel

DETAILS

Yeohlee sought inspiration for her Fall 2006 collection from the architecture of Italian Rationalism, 1926-43. Though it is more often referred to as Fascist architecture, the reality is that this revival of classicism, blended with machine age aesthetics and a later infusion of baroque opulence, had less to do with the totalitarian regime of Mussolini than with the then prevailing ideas of modernity.

SPRING 2006

indexpic

DETAILS

YEOHLEE draws inspiration from an infatuation with the work of Robert Mallet-Stevens and the awe-inspiring engineering of suspension bridges, particularly the flawless rope bridges that have three support cables held up by the stays. The collection is comprised of a wide range of fabrics in contrasting weights, from white gossamer cotton to black double face wool.

FALL 2005

fall2005cover

DETAILS

Yeohlee’s Fall 2005 takes inspiration from a recent trip to Mexico City and the simple and pure shapes of Luis Barragan’s architecture. This is realized through geometric shapes such as squares, rectangles, triangles and circles. Tiers of fabric, cut-outs, ruching and frayed edges – achieved by ripping the fabric instead of cutting it – are recurring design elements.

SPRING 2005

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DETAILS

YEOHLEE’s Spring 2005 collection has an urban and nomadic feel to it. Repetition of design motifs, such as circles, rectangles, squares and triangles recall the replication of architectural ornaments such as tiles, columns and flagstones.

There are many aspects and stories in YEOHLEE’s Spring 2005 collection; it entwines the disparate experiences of the city dweller and reflects upon the different personas of the women in the show who have been a unique source of inspiration.

FALL 2004

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DETAILS

“Fall 2004 is about and inspired by cultural and human chemistry, resulting in a collection that has eclectic references and influences from my collaborators who hail from other disciplines and worlds – artists and gallery owners, architects and hoteliers, film makers, floral designers, actresses, curators, writers and historians, each of whom has collaborated on his or her look/looks for the collection.”

- Yeohlee Teng

This latest collection has allowed YEOHLEE to explore the process by combining different elements from a variety of design disciplines into wearable clothes of the moment.

SPRING 2004

spring2004cover

DETAILS

“I like to make simple clothes and started this collection by reducing the number of fabrics to two different types. The first fabric appealed to me because it appears fluid, is a bi-stretch and machine washable. The other fabrics are silks of varying weights and finishes that share the characteristic of being finely woven and stiff.”

Yeohlee Teng on YEOHLEE Spring 2004

For YEOHLEE Spring 2004, Yeohlee Teng constructs the collection in two different ways, each determined by the character of the individual fabric. She treats some of the textiles as two dimensional geometric planes and by suspending the rectangles, squares and triangles from the shoulder or the waist a third dimension is created. These gabardine and satin organdy shapes then become voluminous when they move. Other fabrics that have structure, particularly the silk zibeline, are sculpted with muslin and paper into shapes of bells and urns.

FALL 2003

fall2003cover

DETAILS

Fall 2003 is inspired by the Arts & Crafts movement, particularly the works of architects Bernard Maybeck and Greene & Greene. Much like the architects of that era, Yeohlee’s work explores the intrinsic character of the materials she uses, here cloth as opposed to wood, tiles and concrete. In each case attention is paid to grain lines, the joints and seams and how they are detailed. There is a shared awareness of the environment that surrounds the work.

SPRING 2003

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DETAILS

For Spring 2003, Yeohlee took as inspiration that aspect of the American Arts and Crafts movement that extols the virtues of everyday objects and a return to honest, simple, forthright materials and workmanship, and design that is dedicated to function. What captured her interest was the movement’s visual relationship to modern design – hybrids made by both man and machine.

FALL 2002

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DETAILS

Fascinated by what happens when traditionally nomadic people settle, put down roots and build, Yeohlee looks to Romania where gypsies have done just that. Using no architects or building plans, they employ free-form construction techniques, creating wildly intricate structures reminiscent of their Hindu heritage.

SPRING 2002

spring2002cover

DETAILS

For Yeohlee it is never about the 60’s, or the 80’s, it is about how we want to look today. Or, in this case, how we will want to look in the Spring of 2002. She sees fashion as a conversation: a series of problems and resolutions in which she works to advance fashion thinking at pace with developments in contemporary art, architecture and industrial design.

FALL 2001

fall2001cover

DETAILS

…tiles, mosaics, Moors, Spain, Institute du Monde Arabe, Jean Nouvel, Ortiz Echagüe are reference points for Fall 2001. The fabrics reminded Yeohlee of geometric forms that are decorative elements prevalent in Moroccan/Islamic culture. Jean Nouvel’s use of glass and screens at the Institute du Monde Arabe and the Cartier Foundation in Paris were a source of inspiration for their play on light and shadow and for what is concealed and what is revealed.

SPRING 2001

Spring 2001

DETAILS

From the tropical to the urban jungle – peranakans and colonials – plantations and lofts. Spring 2001 covers the range in an eclectic and easy manner. The spark that ignited the collection came from the beauty of the fabrics – some with a vintage look or feel to them, particularly in the linen raffia and white cotton eyelets, as well as the birdseye, striped or checked silk taffetas. The color palette is sunny with lots of white, earthtones, oranges, blues, and black.

FALL 2000

DETAILS

Too often, the assertion of independence means sacrificing things that we hold dear.

Not this time. For the Fall and Winter of 2000, Yeohlee is forging a path away from today’s fashion omni-trends, mega-mergers, and inside politics. (The collection is for sale; not the company.) These clothes are yours and yours alone: your own private Switzerland.

SPRING 2000

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At the turn of the century, Yeohlee has chosen to celebrate the Renaissance woman: one who has diverse interests and skills, and a complex life that requires easy and efficient solutions to how she puts herself together. Spring 2000 is dedicated to those needs with an understanding that clothes have to do more than be comfortable and functional; one has to look and feel good in them.

FALL 1999

DETAILS

For Fall 99 Yeohlee sees fashion as visual objects. They are simple components articulated in a rigorous manner that enable the body to move with great ease and comfort. The design is in the construction; the seams are the decoration. Every decision is a design detail, from where a zipper begins to where it ends. There is an awareness of the human form sheltered in negative space.

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